Don Winget Receives Regents' Outstanding Teaching Award

Don Winget Receives Regents' Outstanding Teaching Award

The Board of Regents of The University of Texas System has chosen Dr. Don Winget from The University of Texas at Austin to receive a 2013 Regents’ Outstanding Teaching Award, its highest teaching honor. The award was presented August 21 in a ceremony at the Etter-Harbin Alumni Center on the UT Austin campus. 

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Mary Kay Hemenway Receives National Award for Outstanding Contributions to Public Understanding of Astronomy

Mary Kay Hemenway Receives ASP Klumpe-Roberts Award

San Francisco — The Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP) is bestowing its 2013 Klumpke-Roberts Award for outstanding contributions to the public understanding and appreciation of astronomy to Dr. Mary Kay Hemenway of The University of Texas at Austin. Past awardees include Carl Sagan and Isaac Asimov. The award will be presented at the society’s annual meeting in San Francisco on July 23. 

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Texas Astronomers Discover Pulsations in Crystalized, Dying Star

Texas Astronomers Discover Pulsations in Crystalized, Dying Star

AUSTIN — Astronomers from The University of Texas at Austin and colleagues have used the 2.1-meter Otto Struve Telescope at the university’s McDonald Observatory to discover pulsations from the crystalized remnant of a burnt-out star. The finding will allow astronomers to see below the star’s atmosphere and into its interior, much like earthquakes allow geologists to study compositions below Earth’s surface. The findings appear in the current issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters.

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Science and Music Under the Stars Saturday in Marfa

Science and Music Under the Stars Saturday in Marfa

Event: McDonald Observatory astronomer Matthew Shetrone and Artistic Director Keith Knopp of Yellow Barn offer insight into the science and art behind popular and classical music in an afternoon presentation followed by a discussion. In the late evening, Yellow Barn percussionists perform Le Noir de l'Etoile, a work celebrating the discovery of pulsars.

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Paul Shapiro Elected to Chair the American Physical Society Division of Astrophysics

Shapiro Elected Chair of APS Astrophysics Division

Paul R. Shapiro, the Frank N. Edmonds, Jr., Regents Professor in Astronomy at The University of Texas at Austin, has been elected to a four-year term to the Chair line of the Division of Astrophysics of the American Physical Society.

The American Physical Society (APS) is the principal professional society in physics in North America. Its Division of Astrophysics represents more than 2,400 scientists working in many fields of astrophysics and cosmology.

Texas House, Senate Honor McDonald Observatory for 75 Years of Excellence

Texas Lege Honors Observatory's 75th Anniversary

AUSTIN — Today, the Texas House of Representatives and Senate will honor The University of Texas at Austin’s McDonald Observatory for 75 years of discovery. The observatory’s 75th anniversary is coming up in May 2014.

 A proclamation sponsored by State Representative Poncho Nevárez (District 74, which includes Jeff Davis and surrounding counties in west Texas) will be read in the House Chamber at approximately 10 a.m.

 At approximately 11 a.m., a resolution sponsored by State Senator José Rodríguez of El Paso will be read in the Senate Chamber.

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Sally Dodson-Robinson Wins Annie Jump Cannon Award

Sally Dodson-Robinson Wins Annie Jump Cannon Award

LONG BEACH, Calif. — The American Astronomical Society has awarded Sally Dodson-Robinson, assistant professor of astronomy at The University of Texas at Austin, its Annie Jump Cannon Award for outstanding research and promise for future research by a woman. The prize was awarded at the society's 221st semiannual meeting in Long Beach, California.

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Exocomets May be as Common as Exoplanets

Exocomets May be as Common as Exoplanets

News release courtesy UC Berkeley

Comets trailing wispy tails across the night sky are a beautiful byproduct of our solar system’s formation, icy leftovers from 4.6 billion years ago when the planets coalesced from rocky rubble.

The discovery by astronomers at the University of California, Berkeley, and Clarion University in Pennsylvania of six likely comets around distant stars suggests that comets — dubbed “exocomets” — are just as common in other stellar systems with planets. 

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