Astronomical

HET Observations of an Extra-Solar Planet's Atmosphere

The dotted line shows the planet's orbit around the star HD189733. The planet orbits the star once every 2.2 Earth days, crossing the face of the star well below its equator. The small circles indicate the planet's location during each of Seth Redfield's more than 200 HET observations over the course of one Earth year. The red circles indicate observations during transit; the rest of the circles denote out-of-transit observations. Credit: S. Redfield/T. Jones/McDonald Obs.

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Astronomical

Supernova 2005ap (without labels)

Left: Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) image of the field where supernova 2005ap was found, showing four nearby galaxies in December 2004. Right: Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) image of the same field about 2.5 months later. Supernova 2005ap appears at right center. The supernova's host galaxy is too distant to appear in either image. Credit: SDSS, R. Quimby/McDonald Obs./UT-Austin

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Astronomical

Supernova 2005ap (with labels)

Left: Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) image of the field where supernova 2005ap was found, showing four nearby galaxies (A, B, C, and D) in December 2004. Right: Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) image of the same field about 2.5 months later, showing supernova 2005ap. The supernova's host galaxy is too distant to appear in either image. Credit: SDSS, R. Quimby/McDonald Obs./UT-Austin

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Astronomical

Spectrum of a Distant Quasar

This chart shows the light given off by superheated material spiraling into a black hole at the heart of a galaxy 12.7 billion light-years away. This active galaxy, called a "quasar," is known as CFHQS 1641+3755. Because its light has traveled so far to us, it has lost energy, causing wavelengths to stretch. The light from neutral hydrogen gas, indicated by the label "Ly alpha" here, has stretched from a wavelength of 1216 Angstroms all the way to 8500 Angstroms.

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'Kicked Out' Black Hole

This supermassive black hole has been ejected from the center of its host galaxy. The black hole drags part of its surrounding accretion disk along for the ride. Some of the material lags behind, then catches up, crashing into the moving disk and producing a powerful burst of X-rays. Credit: Tim Jones/McDonald Observatory.

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